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Amra palace

(Qusayr 'Amra)

Amra Palace Tour From Different Cities

Khrana Palace From Amman Amra Palace & Azraq Palace Included
Cost Per Person

The Kharana Palace, Amra Palace, Azraq Castle Day Tour Start From Amman escorted with English speaking driver (From One to Three Persons in a Modern Sedan Vehicle. Four to seven using H1 Minivan ). Pick and drop off to / and from your hotel, early morning at 08:00 am and returns back to Amman around 16:00.

Tour itinerary

08:00 AM Home / Hotel Pick up.

9:00 AM Reach Kharana Palace.

10:00 Drive to Amra Palace.

10:30 Reach Amra Palace.

11:30 Drive to Azraq Castle.

12:30 Reach Azraq Castle.

1:30 Drive to Restaurant For Lunch (Optional).

2:30: Drive back to Amman.

4:00 Drop off your Hotel in Amman.

Inclusions

English Speaking driver.

Modern private Car with AC including gas

(Sedan for 3 Persons,

 H1 Van for 4-7 Persons).

Hotel Pick-up and drop-off.

Exclusions

Entrance Fee Not included

Guides

Any Thing Not Mentioned 

Entrance Fee

you Can show your Jordan Pass at the Main Entrance or you can buy the Entrance fee ticket from the main entrance.

Note

Lunch in Azraq City Cost around 10 – 12 JOD.

Driver (around 10% Total Charges) Tips Recommended.

Khrana Palace From Dead Sea, Amra Palace & Azraq Palace Included
Cost Per Person

The Kharana Palace, Amra Palace, Azraq Castle Day Tour Start From Dead Sea escorted with English speaking driver (From One to Three Persons in a Modern Sedan Vehicle. Four to seven using H1 Minivan ). Pick and drop off to / and from your hotel, morning at 08:00 am and returns back to Dead Sea around 16:30.

Tour itinerary

08:00 AM Home / Hotel Pick up.

9:30 AM Reach Kharana Palace.

10:30 Drive to Amra Palace.

11:00 Reach Amra Palace.

12:00 Drive to Azraq Castle.

1:00 Reach Azraq Castle.

2:00 Drive to Restaurant For Lunch (Optional).

3:00: Drive back to Dead Sea.

4:30 Drop off your Hotel in Dead Sea.

Inclusions

English Speaking driver.

Modern private Car with AC including gas

(Sedan for 3 Persons,

 H1 Van for 4-7 Persons).

Hotel Pick-up and drop-off.

Exclusions

Entrance Fee Not included

Guides

Any Thing Not Mentioned 

Entrance Fee

you Can show your Jordan Pass at the Main Entrance or you can buy the Entrance fee ticket from the main entrance.

Note

Lunch in Azraq City Cost around 10 – 12 JOD.

Driver (around 10% Total Charges) Tips Recommended.

Khrana Palace From Madaba, Amra Palace & Azraq Palace Included
Cost Per Person

The Kharana Palace, Amra Palace, Azraq Castle Day Tour Start From Madaba escorted with English speaking driver (From One to Three Persons in a Modern Sedan Vehicle. Four to seven using H1 Minivan ). Pick and drop off to / and from your hotel, morning at 08:00 am and returns back to Madaba around 16:30.

Tour itinerary

08:00 AM Home / Hotel Pick up.

9:30 AM Reach Kharana Palace.

10:30 Drive to Amra Palace.

11:00 Reach Amra Palace.

12:00 Drive to Azraq Castle.

1:00 Reach Azraq Castle.

2:00 Drive to Restaurant For Lunch (Optional).

3:00: Drive back to Madaba.

4:30 Drop off your Hotel in Madaba.

Inclusions

English Speaking driver.

Modern private Car with AC including gas

(Sedan for 3 Persons,

 H1 Van for 4-7 Persons).

Hotel Pick-up and drop-off.

Exclusions

Entrance Fee Not included

Guides

Any Thing Not Mentioned 

Entrance Fee

you Can show your Jordan Pass at the Main Entrance or you can buy the Entrance fee ticket from the main entrance.

Note

Lunch in Azraq City Cost around 10 – 12 JOD.

Driver (around 10% Total Charges) Tips Recommended.

Amra Palace
Amra Palace Overview

Qusayr ‘Amra or Quseir Amra, lit. “small qasr of ‘Amra”, sometimes also named Qasr Amra, is the best-known of the desert castles located in present-day eastern Jordan. It was built sometime between 723 and 743, by Walid Ibn Yazid, the future Umayyad caliph Walid II, whose dominance of the region was rising at the time.
It is considered one of the most important examples of early Islamic art and architecture.

The building is actually the remnant of a larger complex that included an actual castle, meant as a royal retreat, without any military function, of which only the foundation remains. What stands today is a small country cabin.
It is most notable for the frescoes that remain mainly on the ceilings inside, which depict, among others, a group of rulers, hunting scenes, dancing scenes containing naked women, working craftsmen, the recently discovered “cycle of Jonah”, and, above one bath chamber, the first known representation of heaven on a hemispherical surface, where the mirror-image of the constellations is accompanied by the figures of the zodiac.
This has led to the designation of Qusayr ‘Amra as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
The bathhouse is also, along with examples in the other desert castles of Jordan, one of the oldest surviving remains of a hammam in the historic Muslim world.

That status, and its location along Jordan’s major east-west highway, relatively close to Amman, have made it a frequent tourist destination.

Info From Different Resources

Qasr Amra is on the north side of Jordan’s Highway 40, roughly 85 kilometres (53 mi) from Amman and 21 kilometres (13 mi) southwest of Al-Azraq.

It is currently within a large area fenced off in barbed wire.
An unpaved parking lot is located at the southeast corner, just off the road.
A small visitor’s centre collects admission fees. The castle is located in the west of the enclosed area, below a small rise.

Traces of stone walls used to enclose the site suggest it was part of a 25-hectare (62-acre) complex; there are remains of a castle that could have temporarily housed a garrison of soldiers.

Just to the southeast of the building is a well 40 metres (130 ft) deep, and traces of the animal-driven lifting mechanism and a dam have been found as well.

The architecture of the reception-hall-cum-bathhouse is identical to that of Hammam al-Sarah, also in Jordan, except the latter was erected using finely-cut limestone ashlars (based on the Late Roman architectural tradition), while Amra’s bath was erected using rough masonry held together by gypsum-lime mortar (based on the Sasanian architectural tradition).

It is a low building made from limestone and basalt.
The northern block, two stories high, features a triple-vaulted ceiling over the main entrance on the east facade. The western wings feature smaller vaults or domes.

Construction: who and when

One of the six kings depicted is King Roderick of Spain, whose short reign (710-712) was taken to indicate the date of the image, and possibly the building, to around 710. Therefore, for a long time, researchers believed that sitting caliph Walid I was the builder and primary user of Qasr Amra, until doubts arose, making specialists believe that one of two princes who later became caliph themselves, Walid or Yazid, were the more likely candidates for that role.
The discovery of an inscription during work in 2012 has allowed for the dating of the structure to the two decades between 723 and 743, when it was commissioned by Walid Ibn Yazid, a crown prince under caliph Hisham and his successor during a short reign as caliph in 743–744.

Both princes spent long periods of time away from Damascus, the Umayyad capital, before assuming the throne. Walid was known to indulge in the sort of sybaritic activities depicted on the frescoes, particularly sitting on the edge of pools listening to music or poetry. He was once entertained by performers dressed as stars and constellations, suggesting a connection to the sky painting in the caldarium. Yazid’s mother was a Persian princess, suggesting a familiarity with that culture, and he too was known for similar pleasure-seeking.

A key consideration in the placement of the desert castles centred on access and proximity to the ancient routes running north from Arabia to Syria. A major route ran from the Arabian city of Tayma via Wadi Sirhan toward the plain of Balqa in Jordan and accounts for the location of Qusayr Amra and other similar fortifications such as Qasr Al-Kharanah and Qasr al-tuba.

Rediscovery in 1898

The abandoned structure was re-discovered by Alois Musil in 1898, with the frescoes made famous in drawings by the Austrian artist Alphons Leopold Mielich for Musil’s book. In the late 1970s, a Spanish team restored the frescoes. The castle was made a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1985 under criteria(“masterpiece of human creative genius”, “unique or at least exceptional testimony to a cultural tradition” and “an outstanding example of a type of building, architectural or technological ensemble or landscape which illustrates a significant stage in human history”).

The Painting of the Six Kings is a fresco found on the wall of Qasr Amra, a desert castle of the Umayyad Caliphate located in modern-day Jordan. It depicts six rulers standing in two rows of three.
Four of the six have inscriptions in Arabic and Greek identifying them as the Byzantine emperor, King Roderic of Hispania, the Sasanian emperor, and the Negus of Aksum.
The painting, now substantially damaged, is thought to be from between 710 and 750,
commissioned by the Umayyad caliph or someone in his family. It is one of the most famous frescoes in the Qasr Amra complex.

Location and history

The painting is located in Qasr Amra (also transcribed “Quseir Amra”, literally “little palace of Amra”), an Umayyad desert structure and a UNESCO World Heritage Site about 85 kilometres (53 mi) east of Amman and 21 kilometres (13 mi) southwest of the Azraq Oasis in modern-day Jordan.
The complex has several frescoes painted on its walls.
The remoteness and size of the structure suggest that it served as a desert retreat for Umayyad rulers at the time.

The painting is on the southern end of the west portion of the main wall.
Along with other works in the complex, it was cleaned and preserved in the 1970s by a team from the National Archaeological Museum of Spain.

Historian Elizabeth Drayson estimated the earliest possible date for the painting to be 710, the year of the accession of Roderic – one of the kings portrayed in the painting – and the latest to be 750, the year of the Abbasid Revolution that overthrew the Umayyads.
The artist who painted the fresco is unknown. The patron who commissioned the building, including the painting, was likely one of the caliphs al-Walid I (reigned 705–715), al-Walid II (r. 743–744) or Yazid III (r. 744).[10] It might have been commissioned after the patron became caliph, or before when the patron was a member of the caliph’s family and held the position of governor or heir.

The complex, long familiar to local nomads, was first visited by a Westerner in 1898, by the Czech scholar Alois Musil.[8] He first arrived in the complex and saw the paintings on 8 June that year, guided by a group of bedouins.
Musil and his companion, Austrian artist Alphons Leopold Mielich, tried to remove the painting from the site, causing permanent damage.
A fragment of the painting, containing labels and partial crowns of two of the figures, is now in the Museum of Islamic Art, Berlin.

Musil’s 1907 publication Kusejr ‘Amra included a tracing made by Mielich on the spot, Musil’s interpretative copy made on the spot, Mielich’s later reproduction, and Mielich’s written description of the painting.
This publication included their observations made before much of the damage to the painting was done.

Description

The painting is badly damaged, partly due to the efforts by Alois Musil to remove it.
Large portions of the figures and their garments are not clearly visible. There are six rulers, or kings, standing facing the viewer in two rows of three.
Each king stretches out both hands with palms turned upwards. Inscriptions in Greek and Arabic above four of the figures, written in white letters on a blue background, identify them as:

– Kaisar/Qaysar (“Caesar”), the Byzantine emperor, face not visible, wearing imperial robes and tiara.
– Rodorikos/Ludhriq, Roderic, the Visigothic king of Hispania, barely visible, except for the tip of his helmet and robes.
– Khosroes/Kisra, the Sasanian emperor, appearing young with curly hair, wearing a crown, a cloak, and shoes.
– Najashi, the Negus of the Kingdom of Aksum, in a light garment with a red stole.

The labels were already fragile when Musil found it, and many of the labels were lost when he and Mielich tried to clean the painting and remove it from the site.[13] However, Musil’s 1907 publication provided his reproduction of the labels before the damage.[17] Apart from the four rulers, no identification remains visible for the other two rulers. Possible identities speculated for them include the emperor of China, a Turkic leader, and an Indian ruler.

Alongside the painting of the six kings, on the same wall, is a painting of a woman with the Greek word ΝΙΚΗ Nikē “Victory” above her.
Opposite the painting, towards which the six rulers are gesturing, is a painting of a man seated on a throne. Above this man is an inscription containing a blessing on a person whose name is now invisible.

Interpretation

The intent and meaning of the painting are unclear and disputed by scholars. The highly diverse interpretations of the painting are partly due to the loss of information from the damage.

According to Islamic art consultant Patricia Baker, the Greek word for “victory” appearing nearby suggests that the image was meant to suggest the caliph’s supremacy over his enemies.[10] Betsy Williams of the Metropolitan Museum of Art suggested that the six figures are depicted in supplication, presumably towards the caliph who would be seated in the hall.[4] Other scholars, including Arabic epigraphist Max van Berchem and architectural historian K. A. C. Creswell, argued that the six rulers are a representation of the defeated enemies of Islam.[20] Iranologist and archaeologist Ernst Herzfeld argued that the painting is an Umayyad copy or version of the Sassanian “Kings of the Earth” located at Kermanshah, as recorded by Yaqut al-Hamawi in his work Mu’jam al-Buldan (Dictionary of Countries).
Art historian Oleg Grabar interpreted the painting as an attempt to convey the idea that the Umayyad dynasty was the descendant and heir of the dynasties it had defeated.

The main entry vault has scenes of hunting, fruit and wine consumption, and naked women. Some of the animals shown are not abundant in the region but were more commonly found in Persia, suggesting some influence from that area. One surface depicts the construction of the building. Near the base of one wall a haloed king is shown on a throne. An adjoining section, now in Berlin’s Museum of Islamic Art, shows attendants as well as a boat in waters abundant with fish and fowl

An image known as the “six kings” depicts the Umayyad caliph and the rulers of realms near and far.

Based on details and inscriptions in the image, four of the depicted kings are identified as the Byzantine Emperor, the Visigothic king Roderic, the Sassanid Persian Shah, and the Negus of Ethiopia.
The last one was for a long time unidentified, speculated to be the Turkish, Chinese, or Indian ruler, and now known to represent the emperor of China.
Its intent was unclear. The Greek word ΝΙΚΗ Nike, meaning victory, was discovered nearby, suggesting that the “six kings” image was meant to suggest the caliph’s supremacy over his enemies.
Another possible interpretation is that the six figures are depicted in supplication, presumably towards the Caliph who would be seated in the hall.

The frescoes in all rooms but the caldarium reflect the advice of contemporary Arab physicians. They believed that baths drained the spirits of the bathers, and that to revive “the three vital principles in the body, the animal, the spiritual and the natural,” the bath’s walls should be covered with pictures of activities like hunting, of lovers, and of gardens and palm trees.

The apodyterium, or changing room, is decorated with scenes of animals engaging in human activities, particularly performing music. One ambiguous image has an angel gazing down on a shrouded human form. It has often been thought to be a death scene, but some other interpretations have suggested the shroud covers a pair of lovers.
Three blackened faces on the ceiling have been thought to represent the stages of life. Christians in the area believe the middle figure is Jesus Christ.

On the walls and ceiling of the tepidarium, or warm bath, are scenes of plants and trees similar to those in the mosaic at the Umayyad Mosque in Damascus. They are interspersed with naked females in various poses, some bathing a child.

The caldarium or hot bath’s hemispheric dome has a representation of the heavens in which the zodiac is depicted, among 35 separate identifiable constellations. It is believed to be the earliest image of the night sky painted on anything other than a flat surface. The radii emerge not from the dome’s centre but, accurately, from the north celestial pole. The angle of the zodiac is depicted accurately as well. The only error discernible in the surviving artwork is the counterclockwise order of the stars, which suggests the image was copied from one on a flat surface.

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Petra, Wadi Rum, Dead Sea, Included & More

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Petra, Wadi Rum, Dead Sea, Included & More

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Petra, Wadi Rum, Dead Sea, Included & More

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Car with Driver in Jordan

250$ - 160$ Per Day With Driver

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( Compact ) Sedan Car - Good And Comfortable For 3 Person, Space Enough For 2 - 3 - Medium bag

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Car with Driver in Jordan

All The Car with English speaking Driver.

Car with Driver Jordan 

Can Drive you

to The Following Sites in Jordan :

Petra is the rose city.

Wadi Rum

The magnificent landscape.

Dead Sea in Jordan

The world’s most amazing place.

Also, Car with a Driver in Jordan can Drive you to 

Madaba

best known for its historic churches and centuries-old mosaics.

Mount Nebo

is one of the most revered holy sites of Jordan.

The Mujib Reserve

is the lowest nature reserve in the world.

Main Hot Springs

This oasis-style resort offers an outdoor pool and a spa.

Aqaba

The Jewel of the Red Sea.

Jerash

considered one of the largest and most well-preserved sites of Roman architecture in the world outside Italy.

Ajloun Castle

also known as Rabad Castle, is a 12th-century Muslim castle situated in northwestern Jordan.

Umm Qais

or Qays is a town in northern Jordan principally known for its proximity to the ruins of the ancient Gadara.

Qasr al-Azraq

is a large fortress located in present-day eastern Jordan. It is one of the desert castles.

We offer you to go Anywhere in Jordan, Our driver professional with Good knowledge.

our Car is Comfortable with A/C.

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Our Driver Can Start with you from Amman Airport – Aqaba Airport.

Our Driver Can Start with you From Allenby Bridge or Sheikh Sheik Hussein Bridge.

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